Posts Tagged ‘Writing for children’

As a writer of Paranormal Romance, I was looking forward to reading Bone Dressing. Most of the books I review tend to be non-fiction or horror; all that is about to change…

I tend to try to avoid reviewing books from the genre in which I write for fear of accidental plagiarism. There is no need for me to worry, as from what I can gather from reading Brooks’s Bone Dressing; we all write VERY differently.

Brooks main character Syd is a tortured teenage soul due to losing both of her parents, and spends most days in the cemetery where they are buried. It’s one of her favourite places, or as the character says, “her neighbourhood”.

Syd lives with strict but caring foster parents, and Brooks carries the natural angst and feelings that such a situation would create, cleverly onto the page.

Our protagonist, Syd, is first person narrator throughout the story and Brooks does not disappoint with her ability to keep in age perfect character throughout. There are moments of adult speak, but didn’t we all think that we were grown ups at that age???

As the genre category suggests, this is a love story, and Syd finds love in the form of Beau (clever naming). Thank goodness that he does not have sparkly skin, nor does he drink blood.

(One of my novels is a vampire story so I really shouldn’t say that!)

This is a fast-paced book cram-packed full of adventure, fear, joy and lurrrve (on top of the angst-filled teenage stresses). Oh yes, and there is an evil teacher thrown in there too, i’m sure that we’ve all had one of them *daydreams*…

…I was once forced to stand on my desk and chew chewing gum – in an exaggerated fashion – for a whole lesson, with boys looking up my skirt! My only crime was not putting my gum in the bin / trash before I got to my desk! Evil.

Anyway, congratulations to Michelle I. Brooks for a grand job, and for creating a thoroughly fabulous read!

4/5 🙂

Perfect for teenagers!

I recently received my copy of The Winchester Writers’ Conference Anthology 2010 and it is a fantastic read. For those of us that entered the competitions last year, it was good to read the winning entries and analyse what the judges look for. My own entry into the Short Story competition received a commendation which was one hell of an achievement; i’ve been writing (seriously) for two years.

I can’t stress enough, how important I think it is for a writer to enter competitions and, or, attend conferences. The feedback you receive is vital for your growth and necessary sustenance for your long journey on the road to becoming a published author.

I am proud to announce that my name is published in the anthology (see below), though sadly, my story is not.

I have uploaded the story onto  if you wish to read it http://beta.iwritereadrate.com/books/view/36

The adjudicator for this particular competition was John Jenkins, publisher and editor. 

Here is what he wrote about the entries;

“Compiling  a competition short list from a host of short story entries is not too difficult if you approach the task methodically, work away from other distractions and concentrate. You ask yourself a number of questions:

What was the author trying to achieve?

Did he or she succeed?

Was it worth the effort?

Would I as an editor publish it inviting people to pay for the privilege of reading it and using up some of their time?

It is, as sports commentators twitter: a tough ask. But the answer for everybody on the short list was yes.

To assist in this course of action it is usual to de-construct the story under a variety of headings: Opening, Title, Plot/theme, Pace, Characters, Entertainment, Dialogue, Language and Ending. Other judges use more, e.g. story arc – and occasionally fewer headings.

Then there is something indefinable, a certain je ne sais quoi. Much as I deplore foreign phrases there is nothing quite as accurate as this one.

One story will score high on all headings but another will be a better story. It will resonate in the mind either because the tale is beautifully told or it strikes a chord where a chord needed striking.”

You can enter the 2011 competitions by logging onto this site: http://www.writersconference.co.uk/

Good Luck!

By David Baboulene

David Baboulene is a published author of five books and has had three film production deals; one here in the UK, and two in Hollywood.

David works as a story consultant with training and development organisations, aspiring and established writers and producers. He is also working at Brighton University on his Ph.D. and on the use of story as the most effective possible tool of teaching and learning. David is giving seminars on story principles throughout the UK and in Los Angeles in 2011 in collaboration with The Script Factory, Euroscript and other partner companies including Persistent Writer. David writes extensively on his subject, including his monthly column in Writing Magazine and Writers’ News.

Now over to the man himself;

“In my work I have been fortunate to have conversations with famous people who have made their money from stories, including:

  • Bob Gale (scriptwriter of Back to the Future);
  • Lee Child (16 million Jack Reacher Novels sold);
  • John Sullivan (TV comedy writer of Only Fools and Horses; Just Good friends; Citizen Smith…);
  • Mark Williams (Actor in, The Harry Potter films; Shakespeare in Love; 101 Dalmations…);
  • Willy Russell (Theatre supremo and writer of Educating Rita; Blood Brothers; Shirley Valentine…)

 to name but a few. So, from the insights from these fine gentlemen, from my own experiences getting published and writing The Story Book, my work as a story consultant, from working on films and from undertaking my PhD in Story Theory, here are my top ten tips for writers.

1) If you want to be a writer, read a thousand books.

2) Write every day. Make it a priority, build it into your schedule and discipline yourself to it. Yes, being a writer is glamorous to talk about and a romantic place for dreamers, but the ones who make it work very hard, are professional and productive.  

3) Don’t try to learn ‘how to write’. No course or method or rule book or guru can tell you how to write. There’s only one person who can tell your story your way, and that’s you. Those who make it have self-confidence in writing what THEY think is great. Yes, learn about STORY – where story power comes from, how they work, why they exist, how they resonate, what factors are present in all great stories – then use that understanding to take responsibility and write your story YOUR way.

4) Understand story structure, but structure is NOT a starting point for story development, so don’t let it drive you. Let your creative brilliance run wild and free and write from the heart in creating your story; then later, use your understanding of structure in problem-solving and optimizing your story.

5) Most of all, understand SUBTEXT. And understand the creative behaviours that embed subtext. Subtext is the substance of story. If you have no subtext you have no story. The more subtext there is, the higher a story is rated by the audience. Fact.

6) Stories are about character behaviours. Don’t think about ‘plot’ and ‘character’ as separate things. What a character does when he takes action will define his true character, and what a character does when he takes action will also provide the action. Character behaviours meld plot and character into a single entity (story). Get this right, and your story-telling will be tight, cohesive and greater than the sum of its parts.

7) All the greatest stories show us a character learning and changing and growing through the experiences of the story events (or failing to learn and grow, but the lessons are still evident to us as readers/viewer). Try to ensure that at least one character is offered the opportunity to climb the ladder of life. You will find that this is actually your real story, and this is what resonates with your readers and elevates your story.

8) True character comes only from putting your players under pressure to make difficult decisions. For a mountaineer to climb a mountain might be a huge challenge, but  he’d be delighted to do it, so the conflict is not meaningful and therefore the story is not meaningful. For a mountaineer to climb a mountain to save a stranded friend… risking his own life to do so whilst his children are begging him not to go and his wife says she’ll leave if he does… that is a story. Sit your characters on the horns of a dilemma wrapped in a choice of evils and sandwiched between rocks and hard places and your readers will be gripped…

9) It’s really important to learn to handle rejection (there WILL be rejection…) otherwise you will never send anything off. I know many, many writers who develop their stories… then develop and develop some more… because they are so scared of the Judgment Day that comes the moment they admit it’s finished. There’s no easy way. You have to grasp the nettle and get on with it or give up now. Put your ego to one side (the vast majority of rejections are nothing to do with your ability or the literary merit of your story); dig deep, be strong, and put it out there. When I asked John Sullivan for his advice for aspiring writers he gave me this series of steps that should define a writer’s life:

    A) Write the best stuff you can.

    B) Send it off.

    C) Go to A.

It ain’t rocket science! But you do need to be brave, or else you won’t get anywhere. As soon as your material is good enough, you WILL be recognised… and you WILL get a deal! And I promise you – once you’ve had 10 rejections, the 11th doesn’t hurt so bad!  

10) If you would like more detailed information on any of the above, get in touch with me and I will send you a free chapter from The Story Book on any topic you like, or blog on the subject if it is of general interest.

Very best of luck with your work. Oh, before I go, I think there might be just one more tip we could all benefit from…

11) Get off the internet and go do some writing!
David

JOIN DAVID ON HIS NEW SEMINAR TOUR 

TO ORDER YOUR TICKET GO TO http://www.baboulene.com/

Thank you for sparing us some of your precious time David.

For further information from or about David go to: http://www.baboulene.com

 To purchase any of Davids books visit Amazon with the button to the left or click on any of the following links;

The Story Book: A Writer’s Guide to Story Development, Principles, Problem-solving and Marketing

by David Baboulene. Nov 2010

£8.99 (Amazon.co.uk book)

£1.99 (Amazon Kindle Ebook in the UK)

$2.86 (From the Amazon.com Kindle store in USA)

£1.99 (Ebook direct from David, through his website – Kindle or PDF)


I wanted to start this blog with something witty about the Festival of Writing 2011 but I found this statement so touching that it had to come first. This gives you an idea of the type of people with whom you are dealing and the kind of support that you can receive through The Writers’ Workshop.

“The Promise that Never Dies”

From Harry Bingham, author and WW boss
“If you come to our Festival and an agent is seriously interested in your work, then we will be as helpful as we can in making sure that interest turns into a signed offer of representation … followed ideally by a book deal.

Harry Bingham

Because these things can take time, please rest assured that we will ALWAYS be on hand to help in any way we can. Unless we start to do hands-on editorial work, we won’t even charge for our help. There is no expiry date for this offer. If your work is strong, we’ll do what we can to help with agents, period.

We’ve helped countless writers hook up with countless agents. Last year’s Festival produced book deals, and 2011 promises to do better yet. We very much hope to do the same for you one of these days.”

Harry gave this speech at the event. To offer such a commitment to so many was both brave and beautiful.

There are two people in addition to Harry that stand out for me, they are always going out of their way to help others; Debi Alper and Emma Darwin. A fellow writer friend and myself informed Debi that another talented, aspiring author and Word Cloud member had had a particularly disappointing one-to-one; she was upset and hurt. Debi went out of her way to help this person; to talk to them and reassure them. She sat them down and gave them her time and her shoulder to cry on. These are amazing individuals and kind-hearted humans. Writing is so personal and needs to be nurtured like a child. The Writers’ Workshop staff offer an almost parental guidance so that we may grow as individuals.

The Event itself and how the conference has helped me

I won’t go into detail about all of the workshops that were on offer over the weekend as by the time you get to the end of this blog you will feel exhausted. Instead, i’ll talk about the sessions that I attended and the useful information that I have taken away with me and can pass on to you.

(For more information about the conference itself and all of the workshops that were on offer see this link: http://www.writersworkshop.co.uk/festivals/wshop.shtml )

The welcome speech and keynote address for the event was given by David Nobbs, author of 27 novels and creator of The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin which later became a successful British sitcom starring Leonard Rossiter. Though this sitcom was before my time (teehee) I knew of the authors work. This humorous and honest address set the mood for the whole event; he has a new fan.

My first session, The Toolbox, was with the wonderful Philippa Pride (UK agent for Stephen King, Hodder). Philippa drew upon words by Stephen King from his memoir of the craft, On Writing, as well as using methods of her own. I found the section on using music and mind maps particularly useful. In the Sample of my Writing section, you will see what I wrote to the piece of classical music played; we had around two minutes to write whatever came to mind.

After the speech I attended the Children’s Fiction Panel Q & A session which I found most enlightening. This panel consisted of a mix of agents, publishers, writing consultants and authors. All agreed that we must not underestimate the integrity of our readership, or their technical abilities. More and more children are enjoying the immediacy and ease of downloading an Ebook.

Session two was Making Bestsellers hosted by the witty and vastly experienced Patrick Janson-Smith (Harper-Collins). Patrick was responsible for discovering such talent as Bill Bryson and Terry Pratchett amongst others. What Patrick looks for is originality, voice, tension and story. Patrick does not take unsolicited submissions.

Before session two began, there was a panel Q & A session held in the main hall. The panel consisted of Carole Blake (Blake Friedman. Agent) and Patrick Janson-Smith (Harper-Collins. Publisher). What I gained from this was an overview of an authors rights and opportunities and confirmation that we do indeed need an agent; a bloody good one! I would love to work with someone like Carole (eventually), she really appears to fight the corner of those she represents.

Session three was MS to Publication with Vicky Blunden (Publisher) and Elizabeth Haynes (Author). This session showed that there can be advantages to working with a small publisher!

On Saturday evening there was a Gala Dinner where all aspiring writers, agents, publishers and published authors got the opportunity to mingle and network. The fantastic Kate Allan was kind enough to introduce me to one of my hero’s, John Jarrold! We chatted for a while and he invited me to submit my “best possible” work to him whenever I was ready. How exciting.

Sunday – Session four was with another of my writing hero’s; Nicola Morgan ( http://helpineedapublisher.blogspot.com/ Author of ninety books!). This session was by far my favourite. The advice priceless. One of my one-to-one sessions was with Nicola and I found her to be warm and honest. I did not realise how much work I still had to do until this session.

There were two further sessions that I attended: Laughing Till you Cry with Julie Cohen & Jane Lovering and Creating Worlds with Toby Frost. Both of these sessions were amazing. I came away with a notebook full of tips and advice. What came across strongly in both sessions was believability. Our readers must believe what we write no matter how far-fetched or distorted.

The keynote speech for the event was given by Kate Williams (Historian and author of Becoming Queen/Young Victoria).

On Monday morning after going through all of my notes and one-to-one reports, I have to admit I felt somewhat confused and deflated. I wrote about this on The Word Cloud writers’ forum. There was a vast amount of information to take in and most of it conflicting. What I came to realise later was that, of course it would be conflicting! Agents and publishers views are as subjective as an authors or readers. Not everyone thinks the same. I suppose a clear example of this would be one agent saying;

“No more vampires!”

I disagree with this statement but if this particular agent doesn’t want anymore vampires then I won’t go to them. However, I will always want to write and read vampire stories. Vampires are still hugely popular and always will be. This is just one persons view.

Another agent told me that they did not like fantasy. On checking out their website later I found that they had a fantasy author on their list. Perhaps they just didn’t want to talk to me 😦 You can’t please everybody.

What have I gained from attending the conference?

A new set of skills. Fresh and current advice. New friends and memories that will stay with me forever. Most of all, I have gained the knowledge that we are not alone in this. In our moments of frustration, sadness and insecurity there will always be someone we can turn to; other writers.

I wish you luck in your chosen career and hope to see you at the conference next year!

Today we are pleased to be talking to Jennifer Wylie again about her forthcoming short story releases and her writing life. Jennifer is a regular on Twitter and both friendly and helpful. She is published through Echelon Press.

 

 

It’s been a couple of months since you last stopped by, what have you been up to?

I’ve been a very busy bee! Jump had an amazing release in December, jumping (haha) into the Top 10 Best Seller list on OmniLit on release day. It’s stayed there ever since, and is currently at the #1 spot!

Some very exciting news is I was contracted by my publisher for a short story series. I am one of twelve authors from around the world participating in the dynamic new Electric Shorts division. Written specifically for young readers, the Electric Shorts are high impact stories presented in a venue similar to that of popular television series. Electric Shorts will publish one story/episode each month in eBook. An Electric Shorts season will last six months.

Tell us more about your new stories and how we can get hold of a copy

My first episode [Banished] in the “Tales of Ever” series will debut on March 1, 2011.

Electric Shorts are written for readers between the ages of seven and seventeen with fast-paced and intense storylines. My series, “Tales of Ever,” is a modern adventure fantasy geared toward teens, ages thirteen to seventeen.

Banished

My life was normal. It sucked, but it was normal. At least until I got this new power. I can control fire. It would be cool if it weren’t so dangerous and if I knew how to use it. Pretty much my sucky life took a nosedive once I got it. Yup, everything gone. I suppose I should be thankful some uncle I never heard of took me in. Turns out the whole family isn’t normal and my power is a lot more dangerous than I thought. I thought things couldn’t get any worse. I was wrong. They banished me to Ever.

If I’m lucky, I might survive my first day.

I mentioned I’ve been busy, I also have another short story out in March, Immortal Echoes: The Forgotten Echo. It is a paranormal I’m sure everyone will enjoy!

Sometimes death is only the beginning…

After a bad day Cassy is surprised to find herself shot, an innocent bystander in a drive by shooting. Bleeding to death in an empty parking lot she knows she’s going to die. What she doesn’t expect is the arrival of a strange, yet gorgeous, man who tells her he can keep her from passing on in return for being his forever. Whatever that means…

In desperation she agrees, but after an unusual kiss she is beyond dismayed to discover she has died. To make matters worse, the strange man has disappeared. Her spirit wanders, afraid and alone until she meets another like her and she discovers she not a ghost at all, but something much more.

My new short stories are available in eBook formats at Amazon, Barnes and Noble and OmniLit for 0.99 each. See my webpage for more information http://www.jenniferwylie.ca

I know all of the Mum’s out there will want to know; how do you find the time to write, manage your blog, AND keep a family and home in any kind of order?

That depends how you define order… LOL. I have a lot of energy and run around crazy a lot. Lists are a big thing with me, without them I think I’d lose my mind. I’ve piles of little ones beside my computer. I also try to keep as organized as I can, folders to sort my email, my files. I make up documents to keep track of all my blog dates, who’s on my site, where I am and when etc. Every once and I while I get a bit overwhelmed, sometimes I miss things. But I just do the best that I can!

What is your favourite time of the day to write?

Evenings! I don’t do well with distractions. I will occasionally open up one of my stories and jot some ideas down (so I don’t forget) or sometimes even a short scene or dialogue. Normally I really get going once the kids are in bed. Lucky for me their bedtime is around 7pm!

I recently posted a blog about how we channel negative emotions in our writing, and whether it is possible for an author to write about death and pain without ever experiencing either for themselves; what are your own views on this?

I think it depends on the author really. Some people are very emotional and can tune to these feelings well. Others not so much. Some just wouldn’t be able to convey it even if they had experienced it. Writing is make-believe, when I need to write about my MC losing the love of her life, I imagine what that would be like and write how I feel. Sometimes it takes a while.

Describe your writing environment at home (we’re nosy!)

I’m hidden down in my own little room. I’ve a nice toasty fireplace to keep me sorta warm during these horribly cold Canadian winter days. My writing desk is also my craft station (not that I craft much anymore LOL but all the stuff is still here) I’m surrounded by my candy stash of jelly beans, peanut butter cups and gum balls. For Xmas I actually got a real computer chair, it even has a back massager!

(WOW, I want one Jen! Tee-hee)

What are you hoping to do next?

Hopefully, I can keep up with the busy months ahead. I’ve more shorts to write for my series, and am currently working on edits for my novel to come out in May. I’m heading to the USA for two conferences this summer and I’m really excited about that! Of course there is the never ending marketing too, which I actually really enjoy doing. 🙂

Thank you to Jennifer Wylie for stopping by today, we look forward to speaking to her again very soon!

Thanks so much for having me!!

Good luck with the blog tour Super-Mum!

 

Links to Jen’s amazing tales 🙂

http://www.omnilit.com/product-banished-519511-234.html

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Banished/Jen-Wylie/e/2940012206961/?itm=1

http://www.omnilit.com/product-theforgottenecho-518338-234.html

http://www.amazon.com/Forgotten-Echo-Immortal-Echoes-ebook/dp/B004P5NQ1G

In my last blog I mentioned that I would be attending a couple of writers’ conferences this year in a bid to better my skills and network with other mad people who choose to write. Writing can be a lonely occupation, so any opportunity to get out there and socialise is grabbed with both hands.

York Festival of Writing was recommended by a friend and fellow author so I have decided to give it a go, be brave and get my work and face out there (scary, the face that is!).

In this blog I wanted to give other aspiring authors details about the conference and the wonderful authors/agents/publishers holding workshops and one-to-one sessions. After attending the conference, I will give honest feedback, so watch this space.

The Festival at a Glance

25-27 March, University of York, UK

A brief selection of the many agents in attendance:

Carole Blake; Agent to bestselling authors including Sheila Flanagan, Joseph O’Connor, Barbara Erskine – and author of Pitch to Publication.

Antony Topping & Judith Murray; Antony and Judith are senior agents at Greene and Heaton, and represent such big names as Sarah Waters,Marcus du Sautoy, CJ Sansom, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall & many more.

Simon Trewin (pictured): Co-head of Books at United Agents. Represents Richard Curtis, Nicci French, etc.

 

 

The Specialists / publishers

In their words;

“We’ve also invited specialist agents & publishers who know the market you are writing for. Among many others …”

John Jarrold: The best known specialist in science-fiction / fantasy / horror in the UK. If you write in this area, you HAVE to meet him

Julia Churchill (pictured): Julia is an agent devoted 100% to the children’s & Young Adult market. No one knows this market better.

(I met Julia at Winchester Writers’ Conference and found her to be warm and encouraging.)

 

Jane Holland & Lyn Vernham: Specialist publishers of women’s fiction & romance. And you don’t need an agent to get published by them either!

Philippa Pride: Philippa is Stephen King’s UK editor at Hodder, and is the person responsible for his entire range. She’s also a consultant who loves working with new writers.

 

 

Alan Mahar: Alan runs Tindal Street Press, one of Britain’s smallest but most prestigious publishers. About 25% of its entire output having won or been shortlisted for national literary awards.

Patrick Janson-Smith: As joint MD at Doubleday / Transworld, Patrick discovered authors such as Bill Bryson, Sophie Kinsella, Andy McNab, Joanna Trollope, and many more. Patrick now runs his own imprint at HarperCollins.

Nicola Morgan: Vastly successful author of YA & children’s fiction. No one knows this territory better. Nicola also hosts the successful, amazing and informative blog; Help! I need a publisher!

(I have my one-to-one appointment with Nicola, so i’m excited to receive her advice.)

http://helpineedapublisher.blogspot.com/

 

Amazing authors that are leading some of the mini courses / sessions available;

Finding Your Voice, with Debi Alper & Dr Emma Darwin – Two experienced and extraordinary authors

Getting Published, with Harry Bingham & Helen Corner – Harry Bingham in organiser of the festival (along with his small army of helpers!). Helen Corner is co-author of, Teach Yourself: How to Write a Blockbuster.

 

Kate Williams (pictured): The vastly popular historian and author of publishing sensation The Pleasures of Men.

Learn from the professionals


Learn how to plot
With Jeremy Sheldon. Novelist, screenwriter & tutor at Birkbeck College, London.

Showing not telling
With novelist Jean Fullerton. If you’re confused about what this rule means, you don’t have to be.

Breaking the Rules
With Debi Alper. You know the rules – but what if you want to break them? Debi tells you how (and how not to) proceed.

 

There are many more exciting authors / professionals listed on the website so please go and take a look.

http://www.festivalofwriting.com/

I look forward to seeing you there……….

Honorary Patrons
Dame Beryl Bainbridge
Baroness James of Holland Park
Jacqueline Wilson OBE
Maureen Lipman
Colin Dexter OBE

2010 was the year I decided to become a serious writer and Winchester was my foot up.

Don’t get me wrong, i’ve been writing poetry and stories from around the age of five, but 2010 was the year to take my writing seriously; to be brave and let other people read my work.

Two years prior I had been involved in a car accident that left me with fairly minor injuries…….at the time! The injuries became more serious as time went on. Last October I spent almost four long weeks in two hospitals, and many more months sick and weak; not nice! But it was the kick up the butt I needed to release my inner creative genius, ahem. Boring back story over and done with; exciting future beckoned.

Where do I start? I mean, it’s obvious you take the first step on a ladder, but which ladder?

So, first things first – the internet. Research into other writers I like, read and respect; Stephen King, Stephanie Meyer, James Herbert, Tolkien, Kate Morton, Dickens etc, etc to name but a few (I have eclectic taste in everything!!).

Stephen King had published a book on writing called, well, Stephen King, On Writing; what a perfect place to begin. His “memoir of the craft” was inspirational (a fellow accident survivor) and brilliant, just what I needed to read.

Wise words!!

Amazon was my next port of call; books on grammar, writing and publishing.

Finances and my situation at the time did not allow me to attend a course / college, so books and websites were my only option. Within minutes of searching (books on writing) I found the most brilliant and comprehensive book; Your Writing Coach by Jurgen Wolff. This book covered pretty much everything, so became my bible.

Jurgen Wolff recommended that I attend the Winchester Writers’ Conference, so, I checked out their website. Wow, this year they had the one and only Sir Terry Pratchett giving the Plenary Speech. SIR TERRY PRATCHETT!!! I love him….. ticket sold. Saving every penny I had, I bought my place and entered a couple of the competitions detailed on their website.

Attending this conference was the best decision I had ever made. Winchester guided me to a doorway into a world I never knew existed; a world of words and wordsmiths, aspiring authors just like me. For the first time in my life I felt like I was somewhere I belonged, with people just like me.

“Hello, my name is Kirie and i’m a bibliophile.”

Hundreds of delegates from all corners of the globe attended the 2010 conference, I am honored to call some of these budding writers my friends. We keep in touch, moan and support each other in our otherwise solitary fantasy lives.

 

“The Winchester Writers’ Conference offers a wide range of courses, workshops and one to one appointments for the aspiring or established writer.”

The 2011 conference is a must! I recommend that all budding writers reading this do their best to get there!

http://www.writersconference.co.uk

Barbara Large MBE FRSA HFUW
barbara.large@winchester.ac.uk
Founder-Director Winchester Writers’ Conference