Author Interview with Gerry Fenge

Posted: December 22, 2010 in Artists, Aspiring Author, author, Books, Word Cloud, writers, writing
Tags: , , , , , ,

I first came across Gerry on The Word Cloud writers community. Intelligent and humerous, his imput, critique and general advice have always been spot on. It is with great pleasure that I introduce Gerry to the rest of the world (tadaaaah) and along with many others, I look forward to the release of his Wellesley Tudor Pole biography.

 

A Writer’s Inspiration

What was your favourite / most inspiring writing guide?

We’d been listening to a talking book version of a well-known fantasy novel and Chrissy (my wife) threw her hands up saying, ‘I could do better than that.’

Suspecting she had oodles of hidden talent, I said, ‘Go on then.’ She resisted, but I promised to act as all-round slave, discuss her ideas, offer some of my own, try not to pout when she rejected them, type up anything she wrote, get meticulous with commas, and so on. After a while she found her momentum and was away. Result: young adult fantasy thriller, The Salamander Stone, 120,000 words, scrupulously plotted, written, revised and polished. (We didn’t know the word count would kill it stone dead.)

Next job: send out the letters. Job after that: collect the rejections. Job after that: take stock. Mm, better try some reading services. So she/we worked with Cornerstones and revised the book a lot more. Then she/we worked with Pollingers Agency (yes, they took her on) for the best part of a year until the agent took maternity leave – resulting in much hiatus, sending of enquiries, waiting of months and eventual verdict of  ‘Sorry, no’. Then she/we worked with the Hilary Johnson Authors’ Advisory Service, after which another agent thought there are ‘many published writers who aren’t a patch’ on Chrissy – though the answer was still ‘No’.

But that’s how I learnt the rules. I wouldn’t have bothered for my sake but learnt them for someone else’s sake.
How did it help you?

The first book I wrote, age seven, was ‘Luck for the Goodies’, a short epic about cowboys and justice. A few million words followed in subsequent decades, although rarely in approved form.

Since helping Chrissy, however, I have vowed to be good and do as the industry specifies. I/we have consequently found a few ways to pronounce POV and SNT. (Try a snarl: ‘PV!’ Or a growl: ‘SNOT!’). And we have tossed other ideas back and forth – Narrative Arc for instance, or Active-v-Passive. Most such concepts are instinctive, but it helps to bring them out of the unconscious into the conscious.
What is the best piece of advice you have been given as a writer?

The best advice comes from Chrissy nowadays. Having trained herself up, she became an excellent critic, pushing opinions she previously would have mistrusted.

Also, of course, different people have different strengths. I tend to be stronger on ideas and plot-mapping, whereas she’s stronger on drama and characters. So if she decides a section needs more drama or that someone is acting out of character, I ought to listen because she’s better at those things than me.

What is the best piece of advice you can give to other aspiring authors?

General life-advice: give whatever you can – you’ll get plenty more in return.

Specific advice to authors: who are you? What matters to you? What gets you so buzzing you can’t sleep for thinking about it? What expands your mind, your soul, your whole being? What is unique about you? (Yes, there really is something.)

Then, if you can call to mind an action or an event that set you thinking/pondering/feeling, you might be onto something. Passionate concern + trigger = inspiration.

What do you enjoy reading? Which books have helped you develop your craft?

Wordsworth and Coleridge were in the business of discovering Truths of the Imagination – getting to the essence of things: top men both.

The Alchemist (Paulo Coelho): only a sketch but it has a clear, inevitable, archetypal shape.

My ultimate Desert Island Book, however, must be My Dear Alexias, a selection of letters from Wellesley Tudor Pole to Rosamond Lehmann. (Wellesley Tudor Who? – ah, perhaps I should explain. Come with me, gentle reader.)

Tell us briefly about your publishing journey

Eleven years ago I took a break from self-expression (it can get a bit claustrophobic) and tried expressing someone else, beginning a biography of Wellesley Tudor Pole, the most remarkable Englishman of the last century. Research, collation, editing and writing involved about four years; then a London agent took on the result and some time later retired (not cause and effect, I trust) – after which, the book dozed.

What next? I stepped even further from self-expression and worked for Chrissy’s book instead (result approximately similar.)

And then lo! – the Universe decided fair’s fair and gave me a leg up. In September 2010 a prominent New Age figure in America spotted my wellesleytudorpole.com website, and emailed me to arrange publication.

Starseed Publications (part of Lorian press) will bring out The Two Worlds of Wellesley Tudor Pole very soon. So get ready to place your order. (Come on, you want to know about the most remarkable Englishman of the last century, don’t you? Course you do!)

UPDATE: Gerry’s book is about to be released!! I am told that it will be available for order this week! We’ll keep you informed.


Anything else?

Well, seeing as you ask, look out (eventually) for The Most Beautiful Girl In The World (novel); also for A Short Selective Journey Through Hell (follow-up novel); and maybe even A Few Brief Sorties Into Heaven (if ever I find time). Yup, Gerry finally got back to self-expression. (Or, shall we say, expressing the Universe.) None of these novels are out as yet, but the future’s a wonderful place, and that’s where you’ll find them.

 

Meanwhile

Have a chat with Gerry, if inclined, on The Word Cloud. Not a member? Well, there’s a simple enough remedy for that, isn’t there?

There is a direct link from this blog, over there, on the left.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s